About the Author

Countryside Magazine Contributor

Articles by Countryside Magazine Contributor

In Old Small Farm Tractors, Lubrication is Key

Call me sentimental, but I have a soft spot for old small farm tractors and here’s why. Just a couple of weeks ago, my wife, Becky, surveyed my latest acquisition, a nearly four-foot diameter by 10-foot oak log that I had salvaged from a residence in town after it had died and a tree service company cut it down.

Read More
Why Raised Bed Gardening is Better

End-of-summer gardening is a hectic time of harvesting, preserving, and enjoying the fruits of your many labors. But as the final vegetables are gleaned from the ground, it’s also a great time to think about doing a bit of work now that you and your garden will appreciate in the spring.

Read More
Improving Soil with Cattle and The Best Green Manure Crops

Holistic grazing and the best green manure crops naturally improve soil. Add legumes or rotational cattle grazing to revitalize land.

Read More
Soil-Borne Pathogens Can Cause Plant Blight and Disease

The crops we grow, especially vegetables, are subject to a number of different diseases and plant blight caused by soil-borne pathogens. Soil is full of organisms — both good and bad. The good organisms include worms, slugs, snails, beetles, ants, and spiders as well as gophers and moles and even snakes.

Read More
How to Vermicompost At Home

Even homesteaders on a tiny urban plot make a lot of waste. Our multi-faceted approach to recycling sends most yard waste through our chickens to start the composting process along with both an outdoor, hot composting system and an indoor worm bin.

Read More
Stocking Your Food Pantry with Emergency Essentials

When planning your emergency food pantry, you should first ask yourself two questions: If an emergency occurs, what are the things I will most likely lack; and, what cooking facilities will I have in an emergency?

Read More
50 Must-Haves for TEOTWAWKI

Arguably, the most important thing to store for a SHTF (Stuff Hits The Fan) or complete TEOTWAWKI (The End Of The World As We Know It) scenario is knowledge. Without it, you won’t survive.

Read More
Bread-baking is Becoming a Lost Art

We get so many questions about how to make homemade bread, so I thought I would try to answer just a few of them today. Don’t let all this information make it seem too involved and scare you away from making bread.

Read More
Build an Inexpensive Hay Shed

There are many ways to store hay and protect it from the weather, but some methods are more reliable than others. Some people put hay in their barns, but there is always the risk of fire when feed is stored in a barn, especially if hay is ever baled with too much moisture in it, causing fermentation and heating (which can lead to spontaneous combustion).

Read More
Build Your Own Outdoor Solar Shower for Pennies

I’m not sure when I decided to construct an outdoor solar shower for my family, but I do know that I was inspired by an article in either Countryside and Small Stock Journal or one of the other homesteading magazines.

Read More
Designing Your Ideal Homesteading Land

Homesteading land is neither a farm nor a rural residence; therefore, it presents design challenges that are different from the others.

Read More
Calving Success: How to Assist a Cow Giving Birth

The riskiest time in a calf’s life is being born. Several million calves in the United States and Canada are lost each year during birth or shortly after, and 45 percent of those deaths are because of dystocia (delayed or difficult birth).

Read More
Raising British White Cattle for Flavorful Meat

From setting up on his own from scratch, “straight out of school and from virtually nothing,” Yorkshire, England, farmer Andrew Fisher has come a long way—and so have his British White cattle.

Read More
Akaushi Cattle Provide a Delicious, Healthy Meat

Add to Favorites By Heather Smith Thomas – The word Akaushi means red cow in Japanese. Akaushi cattle were introduced to the U.S. in 1994. “This is the only free-grazing beef …

Read More
Barbados Blackbelly Sheep: Back From the Brink of Extinction
December 30, 2019 · · Sheep

In 2004, there were fewer than 100 Barbados Blackbelly sheep in the U.S.
It took a while for breeders to realize how critical the situation was: Most of us thought there were thousands of these sheep.

Read More